Persepolis (Book Review)

Comments 3 Standard

Persepolis is a graphic novel detailing Marjane Satraphi’s childhood experiences in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. In the story, we follow Marjane from the ages of eight to fourteen, seeing events through her perspective. Marjane is a well informed child, raised by parents who are educated in regards to government. For this, Marjane is a forward thinker, as well.

Though it is told from a child’s perspective, many serious issues of the Islamic Revolution are addressed. We see how the government dealt with protesting and what happened to those brave enough to stand up for their rights. We are also given insight as to why many families did not flee the country at the beginning of the revolution.

I enjoyed this story because I learned to expand my thinking of not only Iran, but of its people. The novel revealed the vast population of educated individuals who were against the revolution that took over the nation. I loved how the bits of humor didn’t overshadow the seriousness of the events that took place. It was an honest retelling of a child’s POV of such large, sudden changes. I would recommend this novel to just about anyone.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Persepolis (Book Review)

  1. Pingback: Trips to the Library | Rae's Reads and Reviews

  2. Persepolis is SO good!! I have recommended this title to so many people, especially people who are sorta interested in graphic novels but don’t know where to start.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I had heard about it through my English class and I decided to pick it up when I saw it in one of those Little Free Libraries. I’m glad I did! It’s great for showing people that graphic novels can deal with serious issues while still being visually enjoyable.

      Like

Leave a Reply to Redhead Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s